The following presentations can be provided by SPELD SA to schools and community groups. Sessions are programmed to run for 2 hours but times can be negotiated and topics covered can be tailored to suit your school’s needs.

Sessions are charged by the hour as follows:

  • Members $175 per hour
  • Non-members $220 per hour

Travel outside the metropolitan area:

  • First 30 mins of travel each way is free of charge then a charge of $100 per hour will be incurred.
  • Where an overnight stay is required the costs will be passed on to the school.

If you would like to organise Off-Site Training in your School, please download and complete the form below and return it to us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Note: Fee charges will be reviewed annually

Off-Site Training in your School Form

 Presentation topics:

  1. Parent Information Session: Dyslexia – what it is and how to help
  2. An Introduction to Dyslexia and Other Neuro-behavioural Disorders
  3. Dyslexia in the mainstream classroom R-12
  4. Dyslexia: How to recognise and accommodate junior primary and primary students in the classroom
  5. Dyslexia: How to recognise and accommodate secondary students in the classroom
  6. Phonemic Awareness: What it is and what you need to know
  7. Creating Independent Writers
  8. Achieving their potential – Developing a whole school policy for assisting students with specific learning difficulties
  9. Explicit Teaching techniques for reading and spelling in the junior primary and primary years
  10. Assistive Technology – Fulfilling the Needs of Adult Learners
  11. Using Voice Technologies for learning
  12. Computers as the Key to Reading
  13. Computers as the Key to Writing
  14. Don’t Modify the Task – Modify the Means of Response
  15. Planning strategies for students with memory difficulties
  16. Teaching a child (4-6 years old) to read and write: Parent Session
  17. Explicit Teaching techniques for reading and spelling in the junior primary and primary years
  18. Listening to a child read (in Junior Primary and Primary years)
  19. Phonic Readers and catch-up readers for older student: using them in your classroom
  20. Using a Six Box in Planning for Struggling Writers

 

1. Parent Information Session: Dyslexia – what it is and how to help

This session looks at the problems encountered by students with dyslexia and the ways in which they can be assisted at home.

2. Dyslexia and other learning disorders: Introductory seminar

This seminar provides information about different learning and behavioural disorders. There is a particular focus on dyslexia.

3. Dyslexia in the mainstream classroom R-12

This session focusses on the following:

  • What is dyslexia?
  • How dyslexia affects a student's learning
  • General guidelines for accommodating the needs of students with dyslexia in the classroom

4. Dyslexia: How to recognise and accommodate primary students in the classroom

Looks at the types of difficulties students with specific learning difficulties experience in the classroom and explores a range of ways to differentiate writing tasks during the planning stage, in everyday lessons and for homework tasks. We also explore programs and assistive technologies that are available.

5. Dyslexia: How to recognise and accommodate high school students in the classroom

Looks at the types of difficulties students with specific learning difficulties experience in high school and explores a range of strategies and ways to differentiate writing tasks during the planning stage, in everyday lessons and for homework tasks. We explore assistive technologies that are available. This talk can be adapted to suit an R-12 school.

6. Phonemic Awareness: What it is and what you need to know

In this session we explore what phonemic awareness is and why it is so important for the development of reading and spelling. How can you teach students with phonological processing difficulties how to hear the sounds in words? A hands-on practical look at what we know about the sounds in words and programs that can help you teach phonological awareness in all year levels.

7. Making Independent Writers of students with working memory problems

Looks at how, from an early age, such children can become independent writers using tools such as Audacity to plan and record ideas, simple mind mapping techniques, multisensory strategies to help them hear sounds in words and word prediction programs such as Word Q4 to expand their written vocabulary.

8. Achieving their potential – Developing a whole school policy for assisting students with specific learning difficulties

Examines alternative ways of grouping and teaching students to accommodate the special needs of students with specific learning difficulties as they move through primary school and then high school.

9. Explicit Teaching techniques for reading and spelling in the junior primary and primary years

Some students need extra support in how to use phonics to read and spell. Take part in a hands-on practical session that will demonstrate a range of teaching strategies and techniques designed to develop automatic decoding and spelling skills. For teachers and SSOs.

10. Assistive Technology – Fulfilling the Needs of Adults

How adults can best use available Assistive technology to help them with their specific needs whether they be educational, job related or personal. Where to source the technology and how to use it.

11. Using Voice Technologies for learning

Working from simple voice recording to high-end voice input applications like Dragon Naturally Speaking. How to prepare all students to use voice recording from reception and gradually develop skills to use voice input when needed. How, as teachers, to decide who needs high-end technology and when to introduce it. How to get it to work for students, which students to train, tips and tricks that will save you time. Please note voice recognition technology is often recommended but not necessarily the answer for all students.

12. Computers as the Key to Reading

An overview of computer software to help students learn to read, from junior primary to secondary. How text to speech and learning to read can and should be used concurrently not in isolation.

13. Computers as the Key to Writing

An over view of the difficulties involved in the process of writing both an how computers can be used to help both for those suffering from dysgraphia and those who struggle with organisation of ideas and getting the ideas down.

14. Don’t Modify the Task – Modify the Means of Response

The traditional response to those who cannot read and write has been to modify the length of the response required from them. Many of these students are in the average to above average ability levels; they just cannot read and write. To modify the task is a “put down”. In this day and age with so much IT available to us we can and should find other ways to help these students convey the full extent of their ideas and not be limited because they cannot read or write.

15. Planning Strategies for Students with Memory Difficulties

Students with Specific Learning Difficulties have a hard time remembering their ideas when writing. We will explore ways of developing independent writers using software programs such as PowerPoint and Audacity; and techniques including six box structures and mind mapping. We will also look at multisensory strategies to help people to hear sounds in words, and demonstrate the uses of assistive technologies.

16. Teaching your child (4-6 years old) to read and write

This session will show parents how they can help their children develop the foundation skills for reading and writing and demonstrate a range of activities that can be incorporated into a 5 minute-a-day holiday program/daily routine. For parents of 4, 5 and 6 year olds

17. Explicit Teaching techniques for reading and spelling in the junior primary and primary years

Some students need extra support in how to use phonics to read and spell. Take part in a hands-on practical session that will demonstrate a range of teaching strategies and techniques designed to develop automatic decoding and spelling skills.

 18. Listening to a child read (in Junior Primary and Primary years)

Reading is the foundation skill which underpins all areas of learning. As a parent you can help your child develop confidence and fluency by applying strategies which address issues such as poor blending skills, as well as guessing, omitting or mis-reading words. This hands-on workshop demonstrates why some reading texts are more suitable than others and how to structure short, efficient sessions which foster engagement and success.

19. Phonic readers and catch-up readers for older students: using them in your classroom

This is an opportunity to view and touch, a range of phonic readers following a variety of synthetic phonic progressions. We will explore how they fit into your existing program, which ones you might choose to start with, how to place students into the system, how to integrate different brand readers into your library when they are following different phonic progressions and what you need to teach your parents when to introduce readers into your program.

20. Using a Six Box in Planning for Struggling Writers

Writing involves many processes and by the time pen touches paper and the challenge of working out how to spell the first word or even which word to use is reached by a struggling writer, the rest of their ideas have disappeared from their memory. This session focuses on how a six box structure can be used as a whole class approach when planning any writing task in a paper-based form and in PowerPoint. The six box structure is also easily used in a PowerPoint platform which helps students with working memory issues. We also explore strategies and assistive technologies that complement the writing process.

 

Presentations by Sharona Edwards

Sharona presents workshops on Thursday, Friday and weekends

To book a workshop with Sharona, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  1. A ‘hands-on’ approach to the Jolly Grammar One program using the School Start Spelling Case
  2. A ‘hands-on’ approach to the Jolly Phonics program using the School Start Buddy
  3. The School Start Buddy and foundational literacy skills
  4. A ‘hands-on’ approach to teaching spelling rules

1. A ‘hands-on’ approach to the Jolly Grammar One program using the School Start Spelling Case 

2. A ‘hands-on’ approach to the Jolly Phonics program using the School Start Buddy

3. The School Start Buddy and foundational literacy skills

This session covers how to use the School Start Buddy with a child or children to make sure they achieve foundational literacy skills. This workshop is designed to guide parents, tutors and anyone working one-on-one with a child.

Also available for Reception/Foundation teachers who would like to use the School Start Buddy in the classroom.

4. A ‘hands-on’ approach to teaching spelling rules

This is a series of lessons that use the School Start Spelling Case to teach a range of spelling rules. The lessons can be used to support any program used in schools. They are also be great for people studying to be a teacher who do not understand rules themselves.

SPELD SA is generously supported by

thyne reid foundation Education Logo CMYK H Large australian executor trustees

SPELD SA would like to acknowledge the support of the Douglas Whiting Trust in the development of this website.

More benefactors and supporters

We are a proud member of AUSPELD

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AUSPELD is a member of the IDA Global Partners Program

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